Nutrition

Dr. Earl Mindell’s Nutrition and Health for Dogs

Dr. Earl Mindell’s Nutrition and Health for Dogs

In this updated second edition of “Dr.Earl Mindell’s Nutrition and Health for Dogs,” the renowned author of “The Vitamin Bible” and his coauthor, Elizabeth Renaghan, focus on how a dog’s body functions nutritionally. They point out that, overall, a dog’s body functions much the same as a human’s body and has similar nutritional requirements. Although some canine needs differ from people’s, dogs also thrive on good nutrition, exercise, clean water, and love-and for optimal health, specific foods and vitamin/mineral supplements. The authors discuss easy, flexible, and affordable ways to keep one’s dog healthy, and elaborate on the different nutritonal requirements of different breeds. They explain why each nutrient discussed is needed, and recommend size-appropriate amounts of them for dogs ranging from small to giant. “Dr. Earl Mindell’s Nutrition and Health for Dogs” is devided into seven informative parts. Part One is all about creating optimum nutrition for one’s dog. In the parts that follow, the authors talk about why it is important to keep a dog’s immune system healthy; they devote a section to natural flea control, and another to homeopathy, an increasingly popular, and highly effective, therapy for dogs; they delve into the five most common dog diseases, and other common canine ailments, and finally, they give an alphabetical, breed-specific listing of potential health problems for dogs. This manual is an important alternative to the multi-million-dollar dog-food industry, which wants people to believe that a dog is happiest when receiving the exact same foods day after day. Nothing could be further from the truth. Nutritional variety is every bit as important for a dog as it is for a dog’s owner, and dogs, lke people, thirve on a mix of fresh foods including frutis and vegetables.

List Price: $ 19.95

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Customer Reviews


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful:
4.0 out of 5 stars
Pretty good but lacks in precision on a few minor points and one major, August 12, 2009
By 
S. Smith (Minneapolis, MN) – See all my reviews

This review is from: Dr. Earl Mindell’s Nutrition and Health for Dogs (Paperback)

I really enjoyed this book for the most part as it offers very SPECIFIC information regarding vitamin and mineral supplementation, not just vague “rules of thumb.” He actually gives you dosages and explains in non-medical language what the vitamins do, why they’re important, and in which foods many can be found. Herein lies my first major cause for alarm: he suggests red grapes as a nutritional form of the trace mineral selenium (p.39)– this is a potentially deadly recommendation as grapes and raisins are toxic to dogs. Dogs who ingest grapes or raisins can develop acute kidney failure and in many cases die. Please do some verifying online and with your veterinarian before taking this recommendation from the book and if in doubt, err on the side of caution and avoid grape products.

The second gripe I have is in regards to his discussion of stress in puppies and adult dogs. This topic is breached around p. 60 and is in reference to how emotional stress can weaken the immune system. While Mindell’s observations are certainly valid from the physical standpoint, he neglects the long-term behavioral implications of his recommendation for owners to attempt to eliminate their dog’s stressors altogether or treat a hyperactive dog with natural remedies such as B-complex, Valarian, kava, and magnesium. Another approach that isn’t mentioned is to introduce stressful situations, such as riding in the car or meeting a new dog, in a controlled, proactive way (potentially with the assistance of a dog trainer). A person doesn’t do their dog any favors by sheltering them from environmental stressors because it’s almost inevitable that the dog will come face to face with the stressor eventually. Starting from puppyhood a dog should be taught how to approach and deal with unfamiliar (and thus stressful) situations. A dog who is not socialized with uncomfortable sounds, sights, and sensations early on is likely to become MORE fearful of these things later in life and potentially lash out in an aggressive manner. I would have liked to have seen a broader approach to dealing with this topic since it deals directly with animal behavior.

It should also be noted that he advocates a raw diet and minimal vaccinations. For those who don’t align with that camp, be forewarned! In all, I think I’m still on-board with Dr. Mindell, but he definitely shook my confidence with that grape recommendation.

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Natural Nutrition for Dogs and Cats

Natural Nutrition for Dogs and Cats

“In these pages, Kymythy Schultze has provided an excellent nutritional text to help us build a healthier life for our animal friends”. (Dr. Stephen R. Blake, Jr., D.V.M.). “[This book is] an excellent starting point for us all. Its pages are filled with helpful hints, good advice and most important, logic and common sense”. (Dr. Bruce W. Cauble, D.V.M.).

List Price: $ 8.95

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Customer Reviews


395 of 416 people found the following review helpful:
3.0 out of 5 stars
Biologically Appropriate But Unnecessarily Restrictive, June 26, 2000
This review is from: Natural Nutrition for Dogs and Cats (Paperback)

This is an only slightly revised/updated version of Schultze’s original spiralbound book "The Ultimate Diet." There are several books on feeding natural/raw/whole foods to dogs, and Schultze’s book is the most restrictive, as it does not allow any grains, dairy products, blackstrap molasses, or raw honey (which many experienced breeders using holistic methods consider a "must" in dog rearing). Unfortunately many people new to raw feeding read Schultze’s book and become convinced that giving their dogs even small amounts of whole grains or a little yogurt with raw honey is tantamount to poisoning them! Those of us who have been feeding a fresh foods diet for decades know that nothing is farther from the truth, but Kymythy believes that *all* dogs do better without grains, dairy, honey, etc., and of course her book includes testimonials only from people who agree with her. While it’s true that some dogs do indeed fare better on a no grains/no dairy diet, others do much better on a more varied diet that includes small amounts of whole grains, yogurt or kefir, blackstrap molasses, and other foods Schultze feels should be avoided.
My biggest problem with this book, however, is that Schultze repeatedly passes of some rather controversial opinions as scientific fact. Not surprisingly, no footnotes are provided to back up any of her claims. She also uses the cancer research from Colorado State’s veterinary school to imply that feeding grains and dairy products causes cancer. While it’s correct that a diet high in certain fats and low in simple carbs is recommended for dogs with cancer (as well as those in remission), there is absolutely no evidence that a diet without grains and dairy products helps to *prevent* cancer. In fact, even the cancer diet recommended by Colorado State includes small amounts of whole grains. Cancer causes metabolic changes in the body which makes what is optimal for dogs with cancer not necessarily optimal for healthy dogs.
Of course I’m not recommending a grain-based diet (I agree that raw muscle and organ meats and meaty bones should make up the bulk of the canine diet), but small amounts of whole grain and cultured dairy products (e.g., yogurt, kefir) can add variety and valuable nutrients to the diet. Dogs, like humans, are individuals and it’s important to remember that there is no one diet that is perfect for every dog.
Depending on the exact composition of Schultze’s diet, deficiencies in certain nutrients are quite possible, and I would definitely not recommend a diet so low in carbohydrates for in-whelp bitches. On the other hand, if you have a dog with cancer or allergies to grains/dairy, this diet may be just what you’ve been looking for. It’s easy to follow, but I do suggest reading a little more on canine nutrition.

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90 of 95 people found the following review helpful:
5.0 out of 5 stars
Thinking about a natural food diet for your pet?, November 30, 1999
This review is from: Natural Nutrition for Dogs and Cats (Paperback)

If you are, I highly recommend this book. It’s written in a easy to read style and is a great introduction on what is needed to successfully implement a raw food diet. This book covers a variety of material, including nutrition aspects, how to make up a meal, how to switch your animal over, and a basic guideline with amounts of various ingredients listed.

The book itself is spiral bound, making it easy to set on the counter the first couple of times you try the menu. There are 118 pages, which includes a natural care yellow pages at the end. Included in these pages are a list of books and newsletters to further your understanding.

The last chapter of testimonials from various people who have switched their pets over to a raw foods diet are touching and inspirational. This book made it easy for me to understand the benefits and the mechanics of a natural diet, that I’ve been left wondering why I didn’t switch my dog over sooner.

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77 of 81 people found the following review helpful:
3.0 out of 5 stars
Too basic, even for a beginner, July 28, 2004
By 
C. Vu (Monreal, Canada) – See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)
  

This review is from: Natural Nutrition for Dogs and Cats (Paperback)

I was new to RAW feeding prior to buying this book. I had done some research and reading on the Internet and already understood the concept of RAW feeding – the core food groups and the recommended proportions of each. However, I needed a book that would help me make the transition from just reading to actually preparing the meals for my pets. This book did not do it for me. It is more of a very basic "theory" book than a "practical" one. I bought the book online – if I had had a chance to flip through it first, I would have gone with another book.

This book pretty much just explains what the food groups are, how they contribute to the health of your pets and the respective pros and cons. But, like I said, you can get this information for FREE on the Internet! Schultze only gives ONE easy recipe for BOTH dogs and cats, with varying amounts of ingredients depending on the weight of your pet. After joining a few RAW feeding discussion lists, I was told that most of the things I read in the book are NOT recommended by fellow raw feeders (eg: feeding GROUND meat, veggies, kelp & alfalfa supplements and BOTH cod-liver oil and fish oil, etc.) Even I knew going in that you can’t use the same recipe for both dogs and cats and yet Schultze only provides one recipe. Cats, I am told, especially don’t need veggies, kelp or alfalfa and they don’t need cod liver oil.

This book would have been more useful had I not done any of my own research first so overall I found the content to be quite disappointing. Somewhat informative but NOT very practical.

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Dog Health & Nutrition for Dummies

Dog Health & Nutrition for Dummies

You do everything you can to maintain your optimum health. Doesn’t your best friend deserve the same? Your dog’s a member of the family and needs the same attention to health and nutrition as you do to stay healthy, be happy, and live longer.

However, it’s easy to get lost in the pet store’s sea of dog products, passing aisle after aisle of dog food. Keeping your dog healthy or getting her back on the road to good health doesn’t have to be difficult, though. Dog Health and Nutrition for Dummies makes it easy to make sure your canine is living a healthy lifestyle. It gives you expert tips and advice on:

  • Basic canine healthcare
  • Feeding your dog
  • Recognizing and treating common maladies
  • Caring for the canine senior

Author M. Christine Zink, DVM, PhD is a specialist in canine sports medicine and professor at The Johns Hopkins University, but above all, a dog lover. She breaks down the complexity of caring for your pooch into easy terms with helpful reminders, warnings, and information, including information about:

  • How to choose and work with a vet
  • Your dog’s anatomy with detailed illustrations
  • Canine first aid
  • Drug therapy for dogs
  • Maintaining your dog’s health with nutrition and exercise
  • Common household hazards

Dog Health and Nutrition for Dummies gives you all the information you need to properly care for your beloved canine pal.

List Price: $ 21.99

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Customer Reviews


17 of 17 people found the following review helpful:
5.0 out of 5 stars
Sensible nutrition approach, May 16, 2002
Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
This review is from: Dog Health & Nutrition for Dummies (Paperback)

I have read many books on dog nutrition and this one is the best.

This book presents both sides of the diet dilemma in an unbiased fashion, and backs it up with research from credible institutions and offers suggestions for improving whichever diet you use — store bought or home cooked. In addition, the author is highly credible in her field — she is an expert in canine sports medicine and is a full professor at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She teaches medical and veterinary students. She has her DVM and Ph.D. Honestly, you can’t get much more credible than that!

The book is not extremist in approach; rather it presents sensible questions about just what is in manufactured dog food, and how do we know it. It then rounds out the picture by presenting alternative diets (home-cooked food) but presents drawbacks there and how to correct them. It addresses supplements as well.

While other topics are also presented beside nutrition (helping your dog age gracefully, training, etc.), I bought it mainly for its nutritional content, and I was not disappointed. The book cites research on nutrition from very credible institutions (Tufts University Veterinary School, as well as others). In addition, if you prefer to cook for your dog, it tells you how and where to send your food so you can find out if your are presenting a balanced meal. It offers other helpful hints as well.

The book is very well written, mainly in active voice, and on a level the layman can understand. This one belongs on your book shelf!

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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful:
5.0 out of 5 stars
A Great Book for All Levels of Dog Owners, November 22, 2003
By 
Donna (Austin, TX, United States) – See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)
  

This review is from: Dog Health & Nutrition for Dummies (Paperback)

Although this is a "for dummies" book, I think it is really a nice book overall that has information for anyone ranging from someone getting their first dog to someone who is very active in the dog world. The author does not "dumb down" any of her information or presentation and presents everything in a clear, informative manner.

The content is very broad and covers just about anything you might need to know about health and nutrition including structure, drugs, parasites, first aid, holistic/alternative therapies, and many more. The author even presents issues such as the hotly debated food issue with a relatively fair and balanced approach. Although she does take a side, she presents the postives and negatives of each side and lets the reader know that there are various schools of thought out there should s/he choose to research further.

The book is attractively laid out with pictures, diagrams, charts, and cute little markers in the margin denoting things such as a "tip", "warning", "technical stuff", etc. It is an easy read that you are sure to pick up some new information from, regardless of your current knowledge about dogs. I highly recommend it to anyone.

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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful:
3.0 out of 5 stars
great on health & first aid, but lacking on nutrition, August 25, 2007
By 
nic (los angeles, CA) – See all my reviews

Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
This review is from: Dog Health & Nutrition for Dummies (Paperback)

first the bad: the nutrition aspect of this book a *really* lacking. while the author initially states that meat should be the base of any dogs meal, absolutely NONE of the recipes she includes have more than 30% meat (give or take). there is no mention of how to discern a good dry or canned food (if you want that try Dr. Pitcairn’s books), and while I can understand her hesitation about raw diets, she completely fails to point out that common sense and basic hygeine can take care of a lot of those problems. in short, the nutrition sections were useless.

the good: the health and first aid sections are top rate and those make this book a must have for ANY dog owner. Luckily the bulk of the book covers these issues (the nutrition section is very small), and that makes this book a worth while purchase. one of the most useful things is a list of things that is included is a list of what to have in a pet first aid kit.

overall I’m only giving the book 3/5 stars because I feel that a book titled “health and nutrition” should thoroughly cover nutrition and this book just doesn’t cut it. I highly recommend buying it used (which I did) and keeping it around just for the “health” information.

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