Boxer Dogs

One of the most popular dog breeds in existence, this large breed hails from Germany. Energetic, fun and family-friendly the Boxer is a favorite world-wide.

Boxer Appearance

The Boxer has a powerful, well-muscled body with a shiny coat that snugly fits the body. The jaw is square-muzzled with a powerful bite; the lower jaw extends beyond the upper. The Boxer’s hearing is keen making them excellent guard dogs. The coat of the Boxer is fawn or brindle with a white underbelly and white on the front feet or all four feet.

“Flashy” Boxers have white fur reaching up to the neck or face. “Plain” Boxers have white fur on their toes or a small splash of white fur on the chest. Fawn covers a range of colors from yellow or beige to various shades of red. Brindle is a tiger-like stripe of black against a fawn background. Some brindle Boxers have more black than fawn in the stripes and are called “reverse brindle.” So-called “white” boxers actually have a base coat of fawn or brindle with excessive white markings.

AKC standards do not allow for more than one-third of the Boxer’s coat to be white for show. White Boxers are not allowed in AKC show dog competitions but you will often find them in obedience and agility trials. Boxers do not carry a gene for solid black coat color and no purebred Boxer will be black. Boxers intended for the show ring were once required to have docked tail and ears, but in 2005 AKC standards changed to allow a description of undocked ears.

The first registered Boxer AKC championship was awarded in 1915. In 1949 Bang Away was awarded Best in Show at Westminster and went on to win 121 show awards in a six-year period. Bang Away became famous and appeared on the front of many popular magazines including Life and Esquire. The Boxer became very popular in the US due to his success and is still one of the ten most popular breeds of dog.

All About Boxer Dogs and Puppies

The Boxer is an energetic, fun loving breed of dog whose ancestors are German mastiff-type dogs, the Bullenbeiszer and Barenbeiszer. The dogs were bred indiscriminately. Over time, the Bullenbeiszer became smaller and was called the Brabanter.

These strong and agile dogs were used by the elite for hunting wild boar, deer and bear. The dogs’ ears were cropped to avoid being injured by the game animals. Their strong jaws enabled them to seize and hold the prey for the hunter, while his recessed nose allowed him to breathe.

In about 1830 the Brabanter was bred with the English Bulldog ancestor. These dogs were white in color and often used by cattle dealers to round up livestock. Because of their ability to learn tricks easily, and their clownish nature, they were also popular circus dogs.

By the early 1900’s the Boxer was well established in North America and was soon recognized by the American Kennel Club. Since that time, the handsome Boxer has grown steadily in popularity to become one of the most widely adopted pets in America.

Is a Boxer the Right Breed of Dog For You?

A dog lover who chooses a Boxer as a pet should consider the activity level and lifestyle of the family. Boxers will not do well in a family where they will be left alone all day while their people are at work. Training must begin at an early age to teach appropriate behavior. They need consistent physical and mental exercise to keep from becoming bored and destructive. If you are willing and able to give the Boxer the time he needs you will have a loyal, loving, lively and intelligent companion.

Boxer Dog Breed Facts and Information

Boxer Facts

  • Country of Origin: Germany
  • Size: All roughly mid-sized
  • Height: 22.5 – 25 inches (male)
    21 – 23.5 (female)
  • Weight 65 – 80 pounds (male)
    50 – 64 pounds (female)
  • Color: Fawn Boxer
    Brindle Boxer
    Both varieties may have white flashing and black mask.
  • Exercise Needs: Moderate
  • Grooming Demands: Minimal
  • Life Expectancy: 8 – 10 years
  • Good With Children: Yes, with supervision.
  • Ease of Training: Moderate

Boxer History

The modern Boxer has evolved from two breeds of extinct European dogs. The larger Danziger Bullenbeiser and the Brabenter Bullenbeiser were both used as a hunting companions and assistants. These dogs were used to chase after prey, take them down and await the hunter’s arrival.

In the 1830’s the boxer was put to work in slaughterhouses as a cattle dog. Soon thereafter, The German Boxer Klub was formed in the 1860’s and the breed subsequently flourished. Around the turn of the century, Boxers were introduced to the US and in 1904 the AKC breed standard was established.

The commonly held belief is that the English name “Boxer” was given to the breed because of their tendency to use their front paws when fighting or playing. There are other theories to explain the origin of the name. “Boxer” was a name commonly given to dogs and it may be that the breed name was taken from the first known of the species. Still another theory suggests that the name “Boxer” came from the German word “Boxl,” which was his common name in the slaughterhouses of Germany.

Throughout the years, Boxers were often used for police work and it was believed that a darker color dog would be more difficult to see at night. During WWI they were used as military dogs and were utilized as pack dogs, attack dogs, guard dogs and messengers. Soldiers returning home from WWII brought Boxers with them and they quickly became popular family pets, show dogs and guard dogs.

Boxer Dogs

All About Boxer Dogs and Puppies

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The Boxer is an energetic, fun loving dog whose ancestors are German mastiff-type dogs, the Bullenbeiszer and Barenbeiszer. The dogs were bred indiscriminately. Over time, the Bullenbeiszer became smaller and was called the Brabanter. These strong and agile dogs were used by the elite for hunting wild boar, deer and bear. The dogs’ ears were cropped to avoid being injured by the game animals. Their strong jaws enabled them to seize and hold the prey for the hunter, while his recessed nose allowed him to breathe.

In about 1830 the Brabanter was bred with the English Bulldog ancestor. These dogs were white in color and often used by cattle dealers to round up livestock. Because of their ability to learn tricks easily, and their clownish nature, they were also popular circus dogs.

By the early 1900’s the Boxer was well established in North America and was soon recognized by the American Kennel Club. Since that time, the handsome Boxer has grown steadily in popularity to become one of the most widely adopted pets in America.

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